The Halo Group Effect

Nov 23

The Five Things You Shouldn’t Have Missed This Week - Friday, November 23
30 Days of Pinspiration - via Pinterest
NYC Window Ad Transforms Street Traffic Into BMW Concept Cars - via Complex
Old Spice and Dikembe Mutombo’s 4 1/2 Weeks to Save the World - via Creative Bloq
Travel Posters for Loch Ness and Other Homes of Mythical Beasts - via AdWeek
Help Remedies Pop-Up Shop - via Branding Worth Spreading

The Five Things You Shouldn’t Have Missed This Week - Friday, November 23

30 Days of Pinspiration - via Pinterest

NYC Window Ad Transforms Street Traffic Into BMW Concept Cars - via Complex

Old Spice and Dikembe Mutombo’s 4 1/2 Weeks to Save the World - via Creative Bloq

Travel Posters for Loch Ness and Other Homes of Mythical Beasts - via AdWeek

Help Remedies Pop-Up Shop - via Branding Worth Spreading

Nov 21

What are people talking about in regards to Thanksgiving? This infographic from ViralHeat showcases the conversation.

What are people talking about in regards to Thanksgiving? This infographic from ViralHeat showcases the conversation.

Nov 16

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Nov 09

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Nov 06

Infographic: Social Media and the 2012 Election

Social Media Election

Nov 02

The Five Things You Shouldn’t Have Missed This Week - Halloween Edition: Friday, November 02
Brands’ Special Halloween Treats (Print) - Branding Magazine
Don’t Haunt Me Bro - via Nestio
10 Classic Logos Re-imagined for the Zombie Apocalypse - via Inspiration Feed
Infographic: 13 Essential Tools for Surviving a Zombie Outbreak - REI.com
USA Luge Team To Dress Like Superhero X-O Manowar - via Bleeding Cool

The Five Things You Shouldn’t Have Missed This Week - Halloween Edition: Friday, November 02

Brands’ Special Halloween Treats (Print) - Branding Magazine

Don’t Haunt Me Bro - via Nestio

10 Classic Logos Re-imagined for the Zombie Apocalypse - via Inspiration Feed

Infographic: 13 Essential Tools for Surviving a Zombie Outbreak - REI.com

USA Luge Team To Dress Like Superhero X-O Manowar via Bleeding Cool

Oct 26

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Oct 19

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Oct 16

10 Things Not to Do When Using QR Codes for Marketing

We recently came across a few lists about how not to use QR codes. Some were helpful and some were humorous. While some of those lists were good, we’ve got a few things of our own to say, as always. Our list is intended to serve as a guide and to help outline some (not so) best practices when using QR codes. The caveats below should help give you a better understanding of what to do and what not to do when considering using QR codes.

1.     Don’t put a QR code in locations with limited/no wi-fi or data access. Why? It’s simple. If you don’t have a signal, you don’t have the ability to actually scan the code. Make sure you place any codes only where a signal is available.

2.     Don’t make a QR code too big or too small. Going extreme in either direction, too large or small, can cause scanning issues. Be sure to check what size works best for the media you’re using.

3.     Don’t put a QR code out of reach of the scanner. Have you seen a QR code on a highway billboard or the side of a moving vehicle? It’s likely these sites are too far out of reach for people to scan the code. Make sure your codes (and any other marketing collateral) are within reach of your audience.

4.     Don’t put a QR code on your website (or in your email). People are already on your website; they don’t need to scan something. That’s actually making it harder for them. If you want to send them somewhere else, use a link. The same goes for email, especially considering that many people read their email on mobile devices and thus have no means to scan the code.

5.     Don’t send users to a web page that is not optimized for mobile. If someone is scanning a QR code, it’s via a mobile device of some sort. You’ll want to make sure the user experience is optimized for mobile. If it’s not, it’s very likely visitors will quickly leave your site. Give them the best experience possible. 

6.     Don’t send users to a cluttered web page. Just as you want to make sure any page is mobile-optimized, you also want to keep if generally clean and clutter free. QR stands for quick response, and in most cases, you’ll be using it for a quick actionable item. Directing to cluttered pages makes it difficult to navigate and understand what you’re supposed to do.

7.     Don’t slap a QR code onto your marketing and simply hope people scan it. Give them a reason to scan it. Why should people scan it? Do you want to give them an offer? Do you want them to fill out a survey? Do you simply want to give them more information? Know why you’re using it, and give people a reason to scan it.

8.     Don’t promote QR codes to an audience who doesn’t know or use them. If you’re promoting to an audience who doesn’t use a smartphone, you’re not going to get a response. You want to use them with an audience who knows what a QR code is, uses a smartphone, and already has a scanner app.

9.     Don’t send users to a page that automatically plays media (without letting them know first). Do you want to be directed to a page that automatically plays a video or blares music at you? Probably not (though in some instances it may make sense). You want to give a little warning so someone can put on headphones or lower the volume if they choose.

10.  If you choose to brand your QR code, make sure they still scan! Did you know you can custom design your QR codes? If you decide to “spice up” the design, make sure they still scan! Adding colors, reducing contrast, and incorporating other design elements can make the codes harder to scan properly.

Keep in mind that a QR code is essentially a link. Remember they are quick response. Putting thought and strategy behind your QR codes will help put you on the road to success.

Do you have any QR code success or horror stories? Let us know in the comments. 

Oct 12

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Oct 05

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Oct 02

25 Questions to Ask When Considering a Social Media Monitoring Provider

Are you looking to monitor social media? You should be. Not only will you find out what your consumers (and potential consumers) are saying about you, you’ll find out what they are saying about your competitors, what your competitors are doing in the space, as well as learn valuable insights.

Below we’ve compiled a list of 25 questions to ask any prospective social media monitoring partner. You may need all of the questions, and you certainly should have a few of your own, but these should help get you going in the right direction for finding what’s best for your needs.

When considering a social monitoring platform/service, be sure to ask the following:

1) Do you offer access to historical data and if so, how far back can we go? Will we have access to historical data prior to when we started our monitoring, or only for data we have already pulled?

2) If we delete search results/terms/queries, can we access that data again in the future, or are they completely lost?

3) Is there a limit to the number of returns we can receive in a given time frame? For example, if there were one million comments/pieces of content relevant to our search, would we be able to see them all, or would we be limited to just a sample?

4) Are we limited in the number of queries (projects, search terms, clients, etc.) we can set up within the platform?

5) Can you provide us with a list of all sources of monitored content (for example, Twitter, instead of “microblogs”)?

6) Do you have firehose access to Twitter or is the feed limited (i.e., will we see all the results or just a sample)? Do you have full access to data from other sites as well or just a sample? What sampling restrictions are there?

7) Do you pull data from any location-based services such as Foursquare? If so, which ones?

8) Do you pull data from forums? Can we add specific forums to target? Can we add other sources such as trade/industry-specific websites?

9) Do you pull data from review sites such as Yelp and TripAdvisor? How about reviews from retailer sites such as Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and others?

10) Do you pull comments on a blog/article post (or can we pull them)? For example, if there is a post or thread that matches our keywords in the main post, but the comment does not mention the keywords, can we pull in those comments? Or can we only pull in items that match the keywords?

11) Do you offer metrics and/or insights on top of matched data? For example, can we see how many comments an article received, how many views a video received, how many shares a post received, and other similar numbers?

12) How does your platform calculate sentiment? Is it manually or auto scored? How accurate is it (percentage-wise)?

13) Can you block specific sources? For example, can you cull results from a specific user on Twitter, but still pull in @ mentions of that user? Can you block specific domains?

14) Do you pull data from mainstream media (e.g., NY Times, AP, WSJ, etc.)? What is the divide between mainstream media and blogs? For example, would we get results from the NY Times and WSJ, or are they mainstream media? Would we get results from their blogs, which often are simply mainstream extensions? Is the data/results exportable to Excel? If so, is there a limit?

15) Can we filter data by location or limit results to specific geographic locations (state level, city level, DMA, ZIP code)?

16) Is all data gathered in real time with real-time updates, or is there a delay before we see the results? If there is a delay, how long is it?

17) In addition to monitoring for content, can the platform also identify potential influencers/brand advocates/ambassadors?

18) Can you engage/post content through the platform? If so, on what services?

19) Can you schedule future posts/updates from the platform?

20) Can you allocate jobs to specific team members?

21) Can the platform be integrated with other services? Is there an API?

22) Can you monitor in multiple languages?

23) Will we have an account representative or search specialist who will help us craft search queries?

24) Can multiple team members be logged in at the same time?

25) What is the cost breakdown? Is it one price, or is it based on tiers and results? Is there a cost for historical data?

  

There is a wide range of monitoring options that run the gamut from free and low scale to very expensive and in great depth. You’ll have to decide which services are best for you based on your requirements and what you’re looking to get out of them.

Sep 28

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Sep 26

How to Merge Facebook Pages: A Step-by-Step Process

Some brands still have their Facebook presence in the form of a profile rather than a page. Not having a page severely limits the use and interactions you’re able to have on Facebook. It limits the apps you can use, the analytics you can receive, and how you can interact with fans, not to mention there’s a “Like” cap at 5,000 (though the recent addition of subscription options helps). This means you are not only limiting how you can use your page, but also the size of the audience you can reach.

Merging pages can be somewhat of a hassle, though, and even a bit tricky. If you need to merge your Facebook pages, or even convert them, our tips below should help make your transition a bit easier. 

Merging Facebook Pages

There are a few ways to merge Facebook pages. For one reason or another, some options may not work or may not be available. If that is the case, move on to the next option. But in all cases, you must be sure that you are an admin of the page, with selected admin privileges (meaning you have administrative rights to manage and edit the page).

How to Convert a Facebook Profile into a Page

You can begin the process of converting a profile into a page here. More information on the process can be found here: Converting Your Personal Account to a Facebook Page. (Be sure to read this first for a full understanding of the process.)

Claiming a Facebook Place

On occasion, you may find there is already a location within Facebook for your location/page. When this happens, you can claim the location. You can find out how to claim locations here: Claiming Places.

Do you have any other tips to offer? Let us know in the comments.

Sep 21

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